Lesson Plans for 8th grade use of The Snake Fence (ESL) by Mark Martell, Sarasota Christian School

8th Grade Language Arts

Weeks #1-4

January 7- February 7, 2014

 

Assignment:  Independent Reading of  The Snake Fence

 

Standards LACC.8.RL.1.1:  Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

 

LACC.8.RL.1.2:  Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

LACC.8.RL.1.3:  Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

 

LACC.8.RL.4.10:  By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

 

S.W.B.A.T. STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO:

  •  Independently read and comprehend The Snake Fence

 

Class Work

  • The novel is not read in class, it is assigned as homework.

 

Homework

  • Chapters are assigned to be read as follows:

Week 1: Chapters 1-7;

Week 2: Chapters 8-14;

Week 3: Chapters 15-20;

Week 4 Chapters 21-26

  • At the beginning of each new week the students are given the study guide questions for the corresponding chapters.  The study guide questions are open ended so that the students will have to find their own answers while reading the text.  Unbeknownst to the student, this encourages them to read the text several times in order to find the answers to the study guide questions.  The study guide questions are the same questions that will be asked on the reading comprehension quizzes, which also encourages multiple reads of the text in order to locate the answers.
  • Answering the study guide questions requires the students to find text evidence to support their answers.  The questions are designed to guide the student in identifying themes, lines that propel the action, aspects that develop a character, or aspects that provoke decisions.

 

Assessment

  • Basic levels of reading comprehension are assessed at the end of each week through a multiple choice reading quiz.  These quiz questions are the same questions asked on the study guides.
  • Reading comprehension is assessed in more depth through a written book report which will be described in a separate lesson plan to follow. (See Assignment:  Book Report for The Snake Fence)

 

 

 

 

8th Grade Language Arts

Weeks #1-4

January 7- February 7, 2014

 

Assignment:  Vocabulary Integration with The Snake Fence

 

Standards LACC.8.RL.2.4:  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

 

LACC.8.L.3.4:  Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words or phrases based on grade 8 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

  1. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
  2. (this standard is not integrated into this lesson)
  3. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.
  4. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

 

LACC.8.L.3.6:  Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

 

S.W.B.A.T. STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO:

  •  Not only determine the meaning of but also acquire for personal use, unknown or unfamiliar words.

 

Class Work

  • Chapters are assigned to be read as follows:

Week 1: Chapters 1-7;

Week 2: Chapters 8-14;

Week 3: Chapters 15-20;

Week 4 Chapters 21-26

  • At the beginning of each new week the students are given the vocabulary word exercises for the corresponding chapters.
  • The vocabulary exercises indicate on which page each word can be found.  Begin the lesson by having the students locate the word in their book and then determine the meaning of the word by using context clues.  (This can be done independently, in small groups, or as a whole group activity)
  • Students will use a dictionary and thesaurus to aid them in determining similar and opposite examples of each word.  Notice that the goal is not to find a synonym or antonym, but rather examples.  By indicating examples students can show a more in depth understanding of the word.  This is an excellent opportunity to integrate technology such as cell phones, tablets, or other computing devices to aid in the research of examples.
  • The final requirement of the exercise has the students use the word in a correctly formatted sentence.

 

Homework

  • There is no homework for this assignment

 

Assessment

  • A vocabulary quiz can be given at the end of each unit of study to assess vocabulary acquisition.  The vocabulary quizzes use the same skills reviewed in the vocabulary exercises.  The students will be required to match some definitions, match some similar examples to the word meaning, match some opposite examples to the word meaning, and match the word to a sentence that the word will best complete.

 

 

 

 

8th Grade Language Arts

Week #4

February 3- 7, 2014

 

Assignment:  Book Report for The Snake Fence

 

Standards LACC.8.RL.1.1:  Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

 

LACC.8.RL.1.2:  Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

LACC.8.RL.1.3:  Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.

 

LACC.8.RL.2.6:  Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.

 

S.W.B.A.T. STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO:

  • Produce an artistic or written book report that will identify key literary features such as theme, main idea, setting, characters, and plot structure (rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution).

 

Class Work

  • An optional classroom element to this project would be to have the students present their projects to the class and explain how they feel it relates to the book.

 

Homework

  • Students will produce their choice of one of four options for a book report
  1. a.     A MOVIE POSTER

You are going to create a “movie” poster for The Snake Fence.  The idea behind a movie poster is that it should make people want to watch the movie being advertised.  The same should be true with your “movie” poster; it should make people want to read the book you have just read.

  1. b.     POSTCARDS

You will create two postcards with a full size picture on one side and a letter on the other side.  You will pretend that the first postcard was WRITTEN BY one character in the book, and will be ADDRESSED TO another character in the book.  The text of your postcard should discuss AT LEAST ONE of the following items:  events, settings, or character relationships that occurred in the book FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE SENDER.  The second postcard will be written as a response to the first postcard.  This means the receiver of the original postcard will now be writing a reply back to the sender of the original postcard.  The text of this postcard should discuss the same events, settings, or character relationships that were discussed in the original postcard, BUT THIS TIME IT WILL BE FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE NEW SENDER.

  1. c.      COMIC STRIP

Pick a scene from the book that you thought was funny, important, or was just your favorite part of the book.  You will draw a 6 celled comic strip.  The comic that you draw should describe the scene from the book that you selected.

  1. d.     VISUAL TIMELINE

For this assignment you will be drawing a timeline that will summarize the plot of the story.  You must draw 6 separate scenes from the story that illustrate the plot as it unfolded in the book.

  • Specific and detailed directions for each assignment can be found in the Instruction and grading rubric packet for the book report.

 

Assessment

  • Final products are submitted to the teacher and are graded according the rubrics found in the book report instruction packet.

 

 

8th Grade Language Arts

Week #5

February 10-14, 2014

 

Assignment:  Commercial Production based on The Snake Fence

 

Standards LACC.8.W.1.1:  Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

 

LACC.8.W.1.2:  Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

 

LACC.8.W.1.3:  Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

 

LACC.8.W.2.4:  Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

 

LACC.8.W.2.5:  With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

 

LACC.8.W.2.6:  Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

 

LACC.8.W.4.10:  Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two.

 

S.W.B.A.T. STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO:

  •  Use technology to design, produce, and publish a commercial for products, places, concepts, or other items discussed in The Snake Fence.

 

Class Work

  • The students will be broken up into small groups of about 5 or 6 students.  They will be asked to create a television commercial based on items discussed in The Snake Fence.
  • The students start by creating a written draft of their concept for the commercial.  As they revise and rework their drafts, they produce a final script which should include all dialogue and stage directions necessary for the actors of the commercial to follow.  (The nature of this style of writing lends itself to the students doing any of the 3 styles of writing supported by the common core: argumentative, informative/descriptive, or narrative.  The style of writing the students produce will depend on the angle or direction they take in writing their commercials)
  • Suggested topics for the commercials include:
  1. A commercial for the book itself.
  2. A commercial for a Quaker meeting
  3. A commercial for a seminar or class being given on finding peaceful solutions to your problems
  4. A commercial for wood working tools
  5. A commercial for a movie based on the book
  6. A commercial for a vacation/trip to Fort Cumberland
  7. A commercial for toys based on the book
  8. A commercial for a buckboard
  • Students should be given class time to create sets and props to use during the filming of their commercials
  • As a final product, students will video tape a live enactment of their commercial.  Depending on the time available, students may use computers and video editing software to edit their commercials.  The final video product is then submitted to the teacher for evaluation.  (Having a digital video camera available is a good idea however many students have the ability to take video through their cell phones.  Many can even edit those videos using apps on their phones.  This can be a great way to incorporate their personal technology into your classroom.)

 

 

 

Homework

  • It is not intended for this project to require students to do homework, however some students may elect to take it home to use the technology available to them in their home.

 

Assessment

  • The final versions of the video commercial are submitted to the teacher as an assessment.

 

 

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